Plants as Teachers: Bringing Your Class Outside

Join world renowned ethnobotanist Dr. Nancy Turner on an ethnobotany walk at Wildwood Ecoforest. Experience first hand what it's like to bring the connections to nature and the forest to life. Experiential learning is known to be one of the best ways to embody knowledge in deep and meaningful ways. During this session you will sample some forest tea and spend time on the land getting to know our plant relatives. Learning how to identify some of these plants, and gaining an appreciation of their cultural importance for First Peoples will be a major learning experience. As teachers you will be able to pass on some of this critically important information to others, raising society's appreciation both of Indigenous knowledge holders and forest ecosystems. You will also learn tried and true outdoor classroom management skills as well as games and activities to lead with your own class outdoors.Please note that this workshop is held outside (location in description).  Make sure to dress for the weather, bring your lunch/snacks and a mask.

Target Audience

K-7

To Bring/Important Notes

Please bring a lunch, water bottle and a mask (just in case).

 

Sessions

9:00 AM - 3:00 PM

This session is full.


Presenters

  • Ecoforestry Institute
    Nancy Turner

    Dr. Nancy J. Turner is an ethnobotanist whose research focuses on traditional knowledge systems and traditional land and resource management systems of Indigenous Peoples of western Canada. She is a Distinguished Professor Emerita, Fellow of the Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation and former Hakai Professor in Ethnoecology with the School of Environmental Studies at the University of Victoria. She is an Order of British Columbia (1999) recipient, an Order of Canada (2009) recipient and holds honorary degrees from 4 BC Universities. She is also author/co-author/co-editor of 31 books and 150+ book chapters and papers. She is a Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences’ Canada Prize recipient and has been adopted into Haida, Kwakwaka’wakw, Songhees and Nisga’a families. Nancy has worked with and continues to work with First Nations elders and cultural specialists for over 50 years.

  • Wildwood Ecoforest Institute
    Reed Osler